Intellectual Property Roundup

Copyright Office Urged to Okay DVD Copying by Consumers (MediaPost)
In a filing with the U.S. Copyright Office, advocacy group Public Knowledge argued that people should be able to copy the DVDs they’ve purchased in order to watch them on tablets.

YouTube Copyright Policy Revised (Guardian Liberty Voice)
YouTube has amended a form used to resolve copyright disputes after the operators of a German web channel received death threats by alleged Islamic extremists, who were able to gain the personal information by filing a fake copyright claim.

Amazon.book and the New Top-Level Domain Names (Publishers Weekly)
Amazon’s purchase of the .book generic top-level domain has prompted speculation about how the e-tailer plans to use it. Amazon bought the TLD for a reported $10 million last week, allowing it to sell domain names with the .book suffix.

Rightscorp Nails 30,000 Users For Piracy in One Month, Still Loses Money (Ars Technica)
Copyright enforcement company Rightscorp told investors it has closed 130,000 cases against Internet pirates, but despite that, the company’s newest earnings report shows it’s losing more money than ever.

Oracle and SAP Settle Bitter Software Piracy Lawsuit (TechWeek)
For years Oracle and its German rival SAP remained locked in a bitter lawsuit over software piracy, but now both parties have reportedly settled the lawsuit, ending seven years of legal wrangling.

Leahy Introduces Same-Sex Copyright Inheritance Bill (Roll Call)
Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy introduced a bill that would let spouses in same-sex marriages inherit each other’s copyrights regardless of whether or not the state where the copyright owner dies recognizes same-sex marriage.

Russia Amends Anti-Piracy Law (Broadband TV News)
The Russian Duma has passed an amended anti-piracy law that protects copyright in a number of fields, including literature, music and software, but not photographs.

Republicans Vow to Take on Patent Trolls in Next Session (The Daily Caller)
Speaking at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Global IP Summit this week, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte claimed he is working with the incoming Senate leadership “to see patent legislation signed into law in the near future.”


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Intellectual Property Roundup

Germany’s top publisher bows to Google in news licensing row (Reuters)
Germany’s biggest news publisher Axel Springer has scrapped a move to block Google from running snippets of articles from its newspapers, saying that the experiment had caused traffic to its sites to plunge.

China Opens Intellectual Property Courts to Improve Image (Bloomberg News)
China will set up its first specialized court to handle intellectual property cases in Beijing within two weeks as it seeks to answer criticisms the country is lax in protecting such rights.

Bestwater – ECJ forces copyright owners to employ access restrictions(fieldfisher.com)
The ECJ ruled that unless the original publisher used technical access restrictions, embedded content would not reach “a new public.” The effect of this judgement is likely to lead to a more restrictive publishing practice, as copyright owners will seek to avoid free-riders taking advantage of the loop-hole the court seems to have legitimized.

Two men jailed over Dancing Jesus site music piracy (The BBC)
The website allowed members to post tens of thousands of illegal links to music which they had uploaded.

AFM: Avi Lerner Warns Piracy Could Cripple Indie Film Business in Five Years (The Hollywood Reporter)
Lerner, the CEO of Nu Image, believes rampant piracy drained the theatrical audience because Expendables 3 was available online for illegal downloading three weeks before it hit theaters.


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Intellectual Property Roundup

China Opens Intellectual Property Courts to Improve Image (Bloomberg)
China will set up its first specialized court to handle intellectual property cases in Beijing within two weeks as it seeks to answer criticisms the country is lax in protecting such rights.

Bestwater – ECJ Forces Copyright Owners to Employ Access Restrictions(FieldFisher)
In a long-awaited decision, the ECJ confirmed its position towards “embedding” of copyright-protected content on a third-party website in the “Bestwater” case, ruling that unless the original publisher used technical access restrictions, embedded content would not reach “a new public.”

Google Takedown Requests Surge After New Anti-Piracy Measures (Torrent Freak)
The number of takedown notices sent by copyright holders has skyrocketed after Google implemented its new search downranking algorithm.

New EU Digital Chief Floats Tough Anti-Google Regulations (The Wall Street Journal)
Th incoming European Commissioner for the Digital Economy has already floated various anti-Google ideas, on of which is to reform existing copyright laws specifically targeting the tech company, in what amounts to an EU-wide “Google tax.”

Android Pirate Pleads Guilty to Criminal Copyright Infringement (Torrent Freak)
In a first-of-its-kind FBI operation carried out in 2012, several unauthorized Android marketplaces were seized and their operators arrested, accused of pirating close to $19 million in illicit apps. This week another member pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit copyright infringement.

Pirate Bay Co-Founder Sentenced to 42 Months in Denmark (Reuters)
Gottfrid Warg, co-founder of The Pirate Bay, was sentenced to three and a half years in prison, in what the prosecutor called Denmark’s biggest-ever hacking case.


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Intellectual Property Roundup

UK High Court Orders ISPs to Block Trademark-Infringing Sites (Securing Industry)
A landmark ruling has been handed down in the UK that establishes the right of trademark owners to secure court orders blocking websites that sell counterfeit products.

German Publishers Capitulate and Let Google Post News Snippets (PC World)
German publishers said they are bowing to Google’s market power, and will allow the search engine to show news snippets in search results free of charge, at least for the time being.

Embedding is Not Copyright Infringement, EU Court Rules (Torrent Freak)
The Court of Justice of the European Union handed down a landmark verdict, ruling that embedding copyrighted videos is not copyright infringement, even if the source video was uploaded without permission.

News Data SHows More Signs that Patent Troll Suits are in Decline (Ars Technica)
A new report published by Unified Patents notes a drop-off in recent patent lawsuits, the second recent indication that there may be a decline in suits following this summer’s US Supreme Court decisions.

Apple Defeats GPNE’s $94M Patent-Infringement Claim (CNET)
Apple last week defeated GPNE in a patent-infringement trial, with a jury determining the electronic giant’s devices didn’t infringe mobile technology owned by the nonpracticing entity.

Judge Refuses to Block Aereo’s DVR Functions (GigaOM)
A federal judge in New York slapped Aereo with an expected injunction, but also hinted how the service might survive in the future, a ruling that could open the door to Aereo operating as a cloud-DVR service.

Google Algorithm Change Hits Streaming, Torrent Sites Hard (Ars Technica)
Video streaming and torrent sites have dropped precipitously in Google rankings after the company altered its algorithm.


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Intellectual Property Roundup

Publishers File Appeal in Lawsuit Against Used eBook Website (The Digital Reader)
The legal woes of the used ebook site Tom Kabinet continued as publishers filed an appeal of the July injunction which declared the site legal.

Publishers Win Reversal of Court Ruling That Favored ‘E-Reserves’ at Georgia State U. (The Chronicle of Higher Education)
The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals issued its long-awaited ruling in the Georgia State e-reserve case, in which the court reversed a lower court’s fair use finding and remanded the case with instructions for further consideration.

Google Imposes New Penalty on Pirate Sites in Search Results (GigaOM)
Google is taking new measures to punish sites that host pirated content by pushing them further down its search listings.

Former Google Lawyer Lee Nominated to Run Patent Office (Bloomberg Businessweek)
Former Google lawyer Michelle Lee is being nominated to run the U.S. Patent and Trademark, after having left Google in 2012 to run the patent office’s Silicon Valley outpost and being elevated to deputy director of the full agency in January.

Getty Fails to Get Injunction on Microsoft Image Widget (Reuters)
Getty Images failed to convince a federal judge to halt Microsoft Corp’s Bing Image Widget, which it said enabled massive copyright infringement, because the software company had already taken it down voluntarily.

What Happens to Tech Policy if Republicans Take the Senate? (The Washington Post)
A look at how a change in power in the Senate could shake up the tech policy landscape.


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

SIIA Applauds Move to Bring Permanent Leadership to PTO with Nomination of Michelle Lee

SIIA today welcomed the nomination of Michelle Lee to be the director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO). SIIA Vice President of Public Policy Mark MacCarthy issued the following statement:

“We are very thankful that the PTO is now likely to get permanent leadership, which is essential to meeting the multitude of challenges facing the business community.  Intellectual property issues are increasingly vital to the software and digital content industries, and critical to making certain America continues to be the world’s leading innovator. Lee is a well-regarded IP professional who will bring intelligence and needed leadership to this important role. We look forward to her successful confirmation by the Senate and to working closely with her in her new position.”


Sabrina Eyob is the Public Policy Coordinator at SIIA. Follow the Policy team on Twitter @SIIAPolicy.

Intellectual Property Roundup

Google Asks Supreme Court to Decide Oracle Copyright Fight (Reuters)
Google has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to wade into contentious litigation against Oracle Corp, arguing that the high court must act to protect innovation in high tech.

Anti-Piracy Group Plans to Block in Excess of 100 Sites (Torrent Freak)
An anti-piracy outfit ‘blockaded’ by the Pirate Party last week in Austria has revealed its expanded plans for website blocking. The Hollywood-affiliated group says it will strive for blocks of hundreds of sites while applying to the court for more effective blocking technical solutions.

YouTube’s Ads on Unauthorized Content Pay Off (Financial Times)
YouTube has hit $1 billion in payments to companies through Content ID, a program that scans user-generated content for copyright infringement and sells advertising on those clips as a way to monetize unauthorized use of the copyrighted material.

Patent Trolling Pays (GigaOM)
Since 2010, non-practicing entities (or patent trolls), have made three times as much money in court as real companies, according to recently published statistics.

Obama Urges Patent Reform (The Hill)
Obama stated that patent “trolls” are one of the “biggest problems” the administration is targeting, indicating the White House is still interested in moving forward with patent reform.

Sen. Cornyn: We Need to Limit the Business of ‘Frivolous’ Patent Litigation(VentureBeat)
Sen. John Cornyn says introducing new patent reform legislation is high on his agenda when a new body of Congress convenes in 2015.


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Curated By Logo