Intellectual Property Roundup

Indies Fighting Google, Amazon for Control of .Music Domain Name (Billboard)
The American Association of Independent Music has announced its intention to give the music industry control of the domain name .music. In doing so, the coalition will go up against Google and Amazon, which are also pursuing .music for their own purposes.

Judges Toy With One-Strike Policy on Patent Damages (The Recorder)
Facing increasing waves of Daubert motions in patent litigations, judges can’t seem to agree on what penalties to impose when the challenges succeed.

A Federal Court Rejects Aereo’s Request to Argue It’s a Cable Company (The Washington Post)
Aereo’s seemingly last-ditch argument to save itself won’t be given an airing in court, according to the Second Circuit Court of Appeals.

Study Shows Patent Trolls Target Rich Companies (The Washington Post)
New data from the National Bureau of Economic Research confirms that patent trolls overwhelmingly target companies that are either “flush with cash,” beset by other lawsuits or have tiny legal teams that trolls likely perceive as weak.

Google Wins Victory in Row With German Publishers (Re/code)
A German regulator handed Google a victory as it said it would not pursue a complaint brought against the Internet search engine operator by a group of publishers for giving users access to their news articles.

Man Jailed For Filming ‘Fast and Furious’ in Cinema (BBC)
A man has been jailed for 33 months after recording Fast and Furious 6 from the back of a cinema. The upload of the film was downloaded more than 700,000 times.

Monkey’s Selfie Cannot Be Copyrighted, US Regulators Say (Ars Technica)
United States copyright regulators are agreeing with Wikipedia’s conclusion that a monkey’s selfie cannot be copyrighted by a nature photographer whose camera was swiped by the ape in the jungle.


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Intellectual Property Roundup

IP News

U.S.Court Grants Order to Wipe Pirate Sites from the Internet (Torrent Freak)
A U.S. federal court in Oregon has granted a broad injunction against several streaming sites that offer pirated content. Among other things, the copyright holder may order hosting companies to shut down the sites’ servers, ask registrars to take away domain names, and have all search results removed from Google and other search engines.

Oracle Bests Rimini Street in Latest Lawsuit Ruling (ZDNet)
A federal judge has backed Oracle’s position against third-party support vendor Rimini Street in rulings over defamation claims and copyright theft.

FTC Proposed Patent Troll Study Gets Go-Ahead From OMB (Mobile Payments Today)
The Federal Trade Commission received approval from the Office of Management and Budget for its proposed study on patent assertion entities, or “patent trolls.” The purpose of the proposed survey is “…to examine cutting-edge competition and consumer protection topics that may have a significant effect on the U.S. economy.”

Anti-Piracy Outfit Wants to Hijack Browsers Until Fine Paid (Torrent Freak)
Rightscorp revealed its new plan to fight and monetize piracy – by continuing to work with ISPs to block web access in order to compel infringers to pay the fine.

Analysis: Monkey in the Middle of Selfie Copyright Dispute (Intellectual Property Watch)
The recent case of a monkey selfie that went viral on the web raised thorny issues of ownership between a photographer and Wikimedia. In this article, two attorneys sort out the relevant copyright law.


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Intellectual Property Roundup

IP News

U.S. Patent Office Rejects Apple Autocomplete Patent Used Against Samsung (CNET)
While the Apple v. Samsung patent battle may have ended overseas, it is still going strong in the U.S. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office rejected several claims of one of the patents Apple wielded against Samsung in the most recent patent-infringement trial.

Suit Against Alibaba Opens Window on Issue of Counterfeiting (The Wall Street Journal)
A lawsuit filed and then withdrawn last month against Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. by several of the world’s leading luxury brands provides extensive details about the issue of allegedly counterfeit goods on the Chinese Internet company’s shopping platforms.

Wasn’t Cloud supposed to End Shelfware? (GigaOM)
One of the supposed advantages of cloud computing over an on-premises deployment model was that you would only buy what you need and pay for what you use. But it turns out customers are still buying more cloud resources than they need and ending up with shelfware, only in someone else’s cloud.

Japanese Manga, Anime Firms Debut Latest Antipiracy Project (Publishers Weekly)
A consortium of Japanese government organizations, manga publishers and anime production and game companies announced that they have formed the Manga-Anime Guardians Project, a combined effort to crack down on online piracy.

Twitch to Mute Copyrighted Music in Video-On-Demand (CNET)
Video-game streaming service Twitch, which is the subject of rumors about a Google takeover, announced a new copyright protection policy that threatens to muffle audio on much of its users’ Video on Demand content.

Photographer Sues Textbook Company for Copyright Infringement (The Pennsylvania Record)
A New York City-based photographer claims Houghton Mifflin Harcourt infringed on his copyrights with photos reprinted in millions of copies of the company’s books.

Australia Eyes Copyright Act Amendment to Curb Downloading (Intellectual Property Watch)
The Australian government is seeking to amend its copyright act to address online copyright infringement.


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Intellectual Property Roundup

IP News

Microsoft Sues Samsung Over Android Royalty Payments (The New York Times)
In the lawsuit, Microsoft said that Samsung stopped making royalty payments on time last fall and is refusing to pay interest for the delay, as required by their 2011 agreement, which related to Samsung’s use of Microsoft’s intellectual property in its Android smartphones and tablets.

Apple and Samsung Drop Patent Fights Outside the United States (The New York Times)
Apple and Samsung Electronics on Tuesday said they had agreed to drop patent litigation against each other in countries outside the United States, including Germany, Australia and Japan.

Police Placing Anti-Piracy Warning Ads on Illegal Sites (BBC News)
The City of London police have started placing banner advertisements on websites believed to be offering pirated content illegally.

UK Adopts Private Copying Exception As Some Rightholders Mull Legal Action (Intellectual Property Watch)
A new United Kingdom copyright exception for private copying cleared Parliament on 29 July and will become law in October.

Lawsuit Threatens to Break New Ground on the GPL and Software Licensing Issues (Opensource.com)
When Versata Software sued Ameriprise Financial Services for breaching its software license, it unwittingly unearthed a GPL violation of its own and touched off another lawsuit that could prove to be a leading case on free and open source software licensing.

Victoria’s Secret loses PINK Brand Battle (CNNMoney)
Victoria’s Secret could be barred from using its PINK branding across the region after a British judge ruled the company was infringing on the trademarks of up-scale shirt-maker, Thomas Pink.

Poll: Should Internet Providers Block Piracy Sites? (The Wall Street Journal)


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Intellectual Property Roundup

Congress Oks Bill to Legalize Cell Phone Unlocking (PC Mag)
Congress approved the Unlocking Consumer Choice and Wireless Competition Act, a bill that, if signed by President Obama, would reverse the Library of Congress’s decision two years ago that made cell phone unlocking illegal.

DOJ to Congress: Make Online Streaming a Felony (The Hill)
The Department of Justice is pushing Congress to increase the penalties for streaming copyright-infringing content online, so that online streaming of pirated content should receive the same consequences as illegal downloading.

House Returns to Patents (The HIll)
The House Judiciary subcommittee on intellectual property will hold a hearing this week on the state of the Patent and Trademark Office. The hearing comes after a concerted push from House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte to reform the country’s patent system.

Infringement To Go: Pirate Bay Goes Mobile (Ars Technica)
The Pirate Bay has now debuted a new mobile service at http://www.themobilebay.org/, which will eventually have such features as personal RSS feeds so users can browse torrents on the go, and start the downloads at home.

UK Police Start Replacing Ads on Copyright Infringement Sites With Warnings(GigaOM)
Under a UK police initiative called Operation Creative, the police will now start replacing ads on copyright-infringing websites with official police banners that warn users that hte site is under investigation.


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Intellectual Property Roundup

IP News

Google, Canon, Dropbox and Others Pool Parents to Ward Off Trolls (Re/code)
A coalition of technology companies have agreed to join the License on Transfer network, promising to grant licenses to one another whenever one of those patents is sold, in an attempt to defang patents before they get into the hands of patent trolls.

Copyright Office Ponders Aereo Fallout (The Hill)
The U.S. Copyright Office is asking the public to weigh in on what the Supreme Court’s ruling on streaming TV service Aereo means for the future of copyright law.

Aereo’s Plan C for Cable (ZDNet)
Aereo’s new plan after the Supreme Court ruled its service was illegal is to argue that it is a cable company and as such Section 111 of the Copyright Act grants it the “compulsory licenses” it needs to re-transmit over-the-air television content.

White House Pulls Plug on Controversial Patent Office Nominee (GigaOM)
The Obama Administration has backed away from an unpopular plan to name a Johnson & Johnson executive and patent reform opponent as head of the U.S. Patent Office.

House Panel Approves Bill to Curb Patent Threats (The Hill)
The House Commerce subcommittee approved Chairman Lee Terry’s bill, the Targeting Rogue and Opaque Letters Act, a bill aimed at increasing transparency and accuracy in the letters companies send to threaten patent infringement lawsuits.

File-Sharing Lawsuits Are a Waste of Mondy, Says the American Bar Association(VentureBeat)
The American Bar Association is recommending to its members that they stop filing file-sharing lawsuits since they “do not yield significant financial returns.”


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

Intellectual Property Roundup

House Commerce Marking Up Rogue Patent Letters Bill (Broadcasting & Cable)
The House Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade Subcommittee has scheduled a July 10 markup for the Targeting Rogue and Opaque Letters Act, a bill that would crack down on “illegitimate” patent demand letters.

Singapore Passes Law to Block Illegal Sites (CNET)
The Singapore government has passed an amendment to the country’s Copyright Act that will let content owners compel service providers to block infringing sites.

30,000 ‘Pirates’ Receive Fake ‘Fines’ With Trojans Attached (Torrent Freak)
An estimated 30,000 Internet users have recently received emails containing copyright warnings and demands for cash settlements. These fake emails detail alleged infringements, and contain Trojans waiting to be installed.

China’s ‘Little I Robot’ Prevails Over Apple in Patent Case (The Wall Street Journal)
Apple has suffered a legal setback in China, after a court rejected its claim against a Chinese company related to its voice-controlled assistant, Siri.

Why Apple Losing a Siri Patent Case in China is Great News for IP Holders Everywhere (Forbes)
A look at why Apple’s loss may be good for intellectual property holders everywhere- Chinese courts and Chinese companies are only going to start taking IP protection seriously when they have some of their own to protect.


Keith Kupferschmid is General Counsel and SVP, Intellectual Property Policy & Enforcement at SIIA. Follow Keith on Twitter at @keithkup and sign up for the Intellectual Property Roundup weekly newsletter here.

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