Posts Under: artificial intelligence

Catching the Bad Guys Using Artificial Intelligence

You probably have gotten a call or email from your credit card issuer asking if you made a particular transaction. Ever wonder what triggered it?  Turns out it is a form of artificial intelligence called a neural network.  Instead of creating general rules about what transactions are likely to be fraudulent, a neural network just looks at all your transactions and figures out your very own individual pattern of usage. If a new transaction is significantly out of pattern, that’s when you get the call or the email.

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AI Spotlight: Using Predictive Analytics, Civitas Learning Helps Improve Graduation and Retention Rates for At-Risk Students

It is no secret that the cost of postsecondary education is high. Obtaining a Bachelor’s degree can cost an individual anywhere from $80,000 to $160,000 depending on the college or university – and that’s for students who graduate in four years. Unfortunately, less than half of students graduate in four years, and two more years of education only brings graduation rates up to 60%. For those students who do not finish their program of study, they leave an institution with no verifiable skills or credentials but have incurred significant debt – leaving them in a worse position to succeed than if they had chosen not to attend college. For universities, graduation rates matter too. Prospective students rely heavily on data like four-year graduation rates and year-to-year retention rates in their decision-making and state funding and continued participation in federal student financial aid programs for institutions depend on positive graduation and retention rates.&n ...

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AI Spotlight: Thomson Reuters's Machine Learning Tool Helps Journalists Report Breaking News Faster and More Accurately

Social media channels like Twitter have been transformative in providing personalized experiences to their users in record breaking time. Users like investigative journalists and reporters have the ability to access a plethora of information and news quicker than ever. In today’s age, many breaking news stories surface and spread first on social media before hitting the press. However, given the over 500 million tweets sent each day, it can be tough for journalists and reporters to differentiate real stories from fake news or unrelated trending topics. Unfortunately, fake news websites often take advantage of social media platforms to drive web traffic in order to gain more coverage. As a result, reporting breaking news stories can often involve sifting through videos, opinions, and content that may or may not be newsworthy.

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Alexa, bring manufacturing jobs back to the United States

U.S. companies have been bringing manufacturing home, and with this has come almost a quarter of a million jobs since 2010. And more are on their way — Deloitte reports that about half of U.S. manufacturing executives plan to bring home some portion of their operations by 2020. But there’s a hard truth beneath this positive trend: While domestic manufacturing is near all-time highs, America is not fully prepared to fill the jobs of the future.

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Productivity Remains Key for Prosperity and Good Policy Remains Key to Raising Productivity

Gavyn Davies writes in an April 30, 2017 Financial Times piece that “there have been some signs that productivity growth may be starting to recover from the low points reached a few years ago.”  Davies notes that Jan Hatzius from Goldman Sachs shows somewhat improving labor productivity growth starting in 2016 – Hatzius used official data and numbers from the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) purchasing manager’s index.  And Juan Antolin-Diaz is slated to publish work in the Review of Economics and Statistic next month showing an increase in trend productivity growth from 0.3% in 2012 Q2 to 0.7% now.  Davies himself, however, concedes that these numbers are tentative.

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An Idea Whose Time is Coming

Benoit Hamon, the French Socialist Party candidate chosen by primary voters this week, has a plan.  He wants to provide everyone in France with a basic income.  The idea has been around for generations.  Why now?  Because Hamon thinks robots are coming for our jobs and we’re going to need to share the wealth they create. U.S. companies and entrepreneurs are flirting with the idea as well. If advanced artificial intelligence can really replace workers at all skill levels, then there might not be enough work to go around.  Brynjolffson and McAfee warn that education and skills training might not keep pace with rapidly advancing technological change – by the time workers learned new skills they would already be made obsolete by the evolution of smart machines. Of course, this hasn’t really happened up to now.  Automation and computer technology have created more jobs than they destroy. When companies introduce automation, it cheapens t ...

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